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Those little sparks at higher voltage anodising.
In Niobium & Titanium
Jama Crawford
Feb 22, 2018
Several related Qs. 1. Is there a good video for using the brush, beyond the intro video on this website and Rio Grande? Brush work is where I had the most sparks. 2. Somewhere I saw/read that the brush shouldn't be applied at high voltage, in other words, it was the equivalent of dipping metal in at high voltage. I inferred from that it is necessary to dial down then dial up when the metal was in the electrolyte solution. I tried to do this by making contact of brush bristles to metal at low voltage then dialing up to the color I wanted (in this case 80 to 100 v). Is that the correct way to apply a high voltage color with brush? I ran into a lot of sparks trying to apply a high voltage color with small brush. I was trying to apply small areas of pink and green. 3. The other control issue was how to keep the brush damp enough. When I watch videos people seem to lift brush off and on into electrolyte solution without dialing up and down. I finally resorted to dribbling electrolyte solution on the metal, but that caused the colors to bleed and spread out. Is it okay to pick up brush and put it down at high voltage, keeping the rest of the plate relatively dry? Or is the dryness of the surrounding plate likely to give rise to a spark? 4. Are the sparks a problem? I am taking care to keep everything at hands-length, but wondered if the sparks are normal part of operation when painting a multi-color panel, some of which are at high voltage? Or are the sparks an indicator that the brush and equipment are at risk of being damaged? Thnx for advice on brush work and sparks.
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Jama Crawford
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